StudySchedule is in Beta. Thanks for using the site.
  • Learn how we recommended the resources below and suggest edits to the data sheet here.
  • Ask for feature requests here.
  • Take a miniature survey. We will read your responses and take them into account. Promise.

All Resources

The following is a list of all the materials in StudySchedule.

Go back to homepage

Official AAMC Resources

AAMC Official Sample Test

$24.00

An ABSOLUTE must buy. Most AAMC materials are must buys. This is the closest thing to the actual MCAT you will get. Many students choose to take this 1-2 weeks before their exam, as a gauage as to how well they will score. It is not scored, so it's a little less valuable than the official scored one, however there are several scoring paradigms online

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC MCAT Section Bank

$45.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC MCAT Official Guide 120 Questions

$10.00

This is a compilation of question from the old MCATs, so it is not as powerful a tool as the newer AAMC materials, however it's invaluable to see how well you grasp AAMC concepts. Defintely grab it if you can.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT Biology Question Pack, Volume 1

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT Biology Question Pack, Volume 2

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT Chemistry Question Pack

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT Physics Question Pack

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT CARS Question Pack, Volume 1

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT CARS Question Pack, Volume 2

$15.00

Many argue the section banks are even more valuable than the AAMC exams itself. These provide 120 questions per section, so defintely get this if you can. Nothing beats material from the test maker

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

AAMC Official MCAT Practice Exam (Scored) 1

$35.00

An ABSOLUTE must buy. Most AAMC materials are must buys. This is the closest thing to the actual MCAT you will get. Many students choose to take this 1-2 weeks before their exam, as a gauage as to how well they will score. This is scored, so take this like it's the real thing

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

20/20
Get it

Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills Content Review

ExamKrackers Reasoning Skills (9th ed.)

$35.99

EK VR is analagous to the CARS section on the MCAT and, even though the name is outdated, the strategies are not. This book does a good job covering wrong answer choices and how not to pick them during the exam.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

Kaplan Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (2nd ed.)

$8.79

Kaplan CARS is invaluable for instructing on effecient test-taking strategies that triage passages for maximal points as well as wrong answer pathologies. However, that is essentially the appeal of this book. Once you understand how to properly employ their method, this book wastes energy on teaching formal logic and other superflous information that doesn't efficaciously enforce CARS practice. Practice passages, which one should do diligently everyday to improve CARS performance, are only included with the online resources tied to the purchase of the course.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills (1st ed.)

$10.00

Teaches you how to think like the testmaker and learn how to dissect passages for the author's tone and the skills and strategies necessary for doing well on CARS. Note their practice passages are more difficult than the AAMCs, therefore they serve as good practice for learning how to quickly decipher the main point of the passage correctly. TPR's full resource packages include thousands of practice passages and questions, as well as full lengths. Good if you have the funds to purchase complete online access. Would recommend over Kaplan's CARS book

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

NextStep Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills: Strategy and Practice (2014)

$31.00

NS CARS practice passages are much longer, and a tad bit more convoluted, than you would typically find on the AAMC MCAT.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

NextStep Verbal Practice: 108 Passages (2014)

$25.00

A little outdated, but gets you acquainted to reading long and detailed passages. Supplement with other material.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 101 Passages in MCAT Verbal Reasoning

$18.00

Despite it being outdated, still a great resource for learning how to tackle the CARS section on the MCAT. Focuses heavily on tricker questions, so it may be prudent to have several other resources that focus on the basics.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

Khan Academy CARS PBQs

$0.00

KA's CARS are generally easier than what you would expect to see on the MCAT in terms of question diffuclty and average passage length. Regardless, this is a free resource that provides good practice. Recommend starting out CARS practice doing a number of these passages

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

MCAT Verbal Practice: 108 Passages for the New CARS Section (More MCAT Practice) 3rd Edition

$20.63

Ns's latest edition of CARS practice. Some passages are good, some are not as representative of the AAMC's style of question. Not an essential buy, but defintely be incredibly useful if you're looking to hammer out some CARS practice, especially if you've completed most of the resources that you have at your disposal.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Reasoning Skills (10th ed.)

$24.45

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <60 days, and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Reasoning Skills focuses on interpretating graphs, math-magic, and how to grasp the author's tone in each passage, since 90% of the questions will revolve around the main idea and/or the author's tone. It's short, so supplement with other material if possible.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

Biology Content Review

ExamKrackers Biology 2: Systems (9th ed.)

$12.00

EK Biology 2 covers the hard facts you need to know for the MCAT, but does not delve into enough detail for those seeing the material for the first time. Recommended if you have a moderate to strong base in Biology, as a supplement to a bulkier review book, or if you have little time to study for the MCAT.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

Kaplan Biology (2nd ed.)

$14.72

Kaplan Bio does a good job of covering the subject in depth, but lacks the full practice experience unless you purchase the entire online course. The discretes at the end of the chapter are good for content retention, but do not closely mimic discretes on the actual MCAT. This last fact goes for the entirety of Kaplan's 7-subject review set.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Biology (2nd ed.)

$13.99

One of the bulkier texts that will cover content needed to do well on this portion of the exam. Contains good passages and practice exams to help retain content, must differ slightly from the style of the AAMC.TPR's full resource packages include thousands of practice passages and questions, as well as full lengths. Good if you have the funds to purchase complete online access, and the time to do extensive content review.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

NextStep Biology and Biochemistry: Content Review (2014)

$69.88

NS Bio/Biochem is very technical in terms of research based content, but lacks the cohesiveness of some of the bigger testprep companies when it comes to organizing and presenting material in a teachable and holistic manner. Would recommend incorporating additional resources to ensure fundamental understanding of the material.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

NextStep Biology and Biochemistry: Strategy and Practice (2014)

$19.00

Good for getting some practice down in Bio/Biochem, but would upgrade to newer materials for content review

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Organ Systems

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

NextStep Biology and Biochemistry: Content Review (2016)

$69.88

Not entirely comprehensive in terms of content review, would supplement with either media or a heavier text. Succinct. NS has great practice exams, however, at unbeatable prices, so definitely check them out!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Khan Academy Bio/Biochem PBQs

$0.00

KA's B/b provides figures and wording similar to the MCAT, and is a great resource to gauge your understanding of the concepts tested on the MCAT. Defintely recommended to do a number of these passages, which also help with content review.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Biology 2: Systems (10th ed.)

$33.99

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <40 days (which we do not recommend), and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Biology 2 focuses on the organ systems and cell biology aspects of the exam.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

General Chemistry Content Review

ExamKrackers Chemistry (9th ed.)

$16.96

EK Chemistry teaches you all the organic and general chemistry concepts on the MCAT, but does not attempt to incorporate a holistic understanding of all topics covered. Great if you need light to moderate review of the topics, but not if you need to extensively review the subject. Recommended as a secondary content review resource, primary if you if a good grasp of the subject already.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Kaplan General Chemistry (2nd ed.)

$10.00

Extensive coverage of every GC concept you will need to know for the exam, and more. A good bulky text for content review. The discretes at the end of the chapter are good for content retention, but do not closely mimic discretes on the actual MCAT. This last fact goes for the entirety of Kaplan's 7-subject review set.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Princeton Review General Chemistry (3rd ed.)

$14.98

TPR Gen Chem will cover all of the content you need to know for the exam, in depth. TPR's full resource packages include thousands of practice passages and questions, as well as full lengths. Good if you have the funds to purchase complete online access.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

NextStep Chemistry and Organic Chemistry: Content Review (2014)

$22.29

One of their better content review books, however many students have suggested they split Gen Chem and OChem into two different books, so that it is easier to read and outline the material. Would recommend pursuing additional resources to fill in any knowledge gaps.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

NextStep Chemistry and Physics: Strategy and Practice (2014)

$29.99

Good for practicing Chem/Phys type questions. Would upgrade to newer materials for content review

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 1001 Questions in MCAT Chemistry

$31.58

Good practice, however use your time wisely. Every 3rd question in the 1001 will test a different concept, so it may not be the best strategy to do every single question in the book, unless you have the time. Watch out for errors!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Chemical Processes General Chemistry

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

NextStep Chemistry and Organic Chemistry: Content Review (2016)

$22.29

Not entirely comprehensive in terms of content review, would supplement with either media or a heavier text. Succinct. NS has great practice exams, however, at unbeatable prices, so definitely check them out!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Barron's New MCAT (2nd ed.)

$22.00

Barron's is a household name in standardized test prep, but fails to deliver for the MCAT. It's a good supplementary resource and gives solid content review, but it's practice tests are few and flawed. If using primarily for content review, supplement with secondary resources.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

Khan Academy Chem/Phys PBQs

$0.00

KA's C/P is heavy on calculations, oftentimes going beyond the scope of the MCAT, but is good for reinforcing foundational concepts in chemistry and physics. If you can't solve many of the problems, don't fret, because you most likely won't find problems of that difficulty on the exam. Not a bad idea to do some problems, but do not focus too much time here, because the MCAT contains far less C/P questions than it once did.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Chemistry (10th ed.)

$37.87

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <60 days, and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Chemistry includes Organic Chemistry, and a plethora of practice questions that make sure you get these concepts down. Even if you do not have time to read the lectures, do the practice problems, since that is what will make the material stick more than anything else.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Organic Chemistry Content Review

Kaplan Organic Chemistry (2nd ed.)

$12.98

Organic Chemistry is bane of many pre-med's undergraduate experience, but Kaplan does a good job reviewing what you need to know for the exam, but more importantly, why things react the way they react. The discretes at the end of the chapter are good for content retention, but do not closely mimic discretes on the actual MCAT. This last fact goes for the entirety of Kaplan's 7-subject review set.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Organic Chemistry (3rd ed.)

$14.87

TPR Organic Chem analyzes extensively each concept you need to know for test day, and more. TPR's full resource packages include thousands of practice passages and questions, as well as full lengths. Good if you have the funds to purchase complete online access.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 1001 Questions in MCAT Organic Chemistry

$34.00

Good practice. Introduces you to MCAT-like ochem questions. Watch out for errors

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Chemical Processes Organic Chemistry

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

Physics Content Review

ExamKrackers Physics (9th ed.)

$24.35

EK Physics will help you memorize the formulas you need to know to solve the vast majority of problems on the MCAT, but does not attempt to synthesize the materials in a way in which the reader can reason through physics concepts. Adequate if you need light to moderate review of the topics, but not if you need to extensively review the subject. Recommended as a secondary content review resource, primary if you if a good grasp of the subject already.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

Kaplan Physics and Math (2nd ed.)

$9.00

Kaplan Physics will teach you every formula you need to know for the MCAT, and then some. Good for someone learning the material for the first time, or who needs to do heavy content review. The calculations in some of the in-text questions and discretes are beyond the scope of the MCAT, but nevertheless do a good job on preparing you for the calculations you will need to do on the exam. The discretes at the end of the chapter are good for content retention, but do not closely mimic discretes on the actual MCAT. This last fact goes for the entirety of Kaplan's 7-subject review set.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Physics and Math (3rd ed.)

$10.00

TPR Physics will teach you all the physics concepts you should know for test day, and then some. TPR's full resource packages include thousands of practice passages and questions, as well as full lengths. Good if you have the funds to purchase complete online access.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

NextStep Physics and Math: Content Review (2014)

$20.85

NS Phys/Math teaches you all the math tricks you need to know for the exam, but goes far beyond the scope of the MCAT with regards to Physics. Good if your knowledge base is weak, but some of the calculations are more difficult than what many have encountered on the official exam.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 1001 Questions in MCAT Physics

$39.98

Despite its publication date, probably one of the best package of physics practice problems on the market. Defintely a must-buy if physics is your weak point, and you want to drill in how to do various physics problems

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Physical Processes

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

NextStep Physics and Math: Content Review (2016)

$20.85

Not entirely comprehensive in terms of content review, would supplement with either media or a heavier text. Succinct. NS has great practice exams, however, at unbeatable prices, so definitely check them out!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Physics (10th ed.)

$33.27

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <60 days, and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Physics will give you all the formulas you'll need for test day, but not delve on the topics you may or may not need a deep understanding though. Questions are tricky, but help consolidate the matieral.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Behavioral Sciences Content Review

ExamKrackers Psychology & Sociology (9th ed.)

$20.00

EK Psyc/Soc, as you probably guessed, teaches the bare necessities (no pun intended) for the MCAT. If Psyc/Soc is your weakest subject, it's recommended you find a bulkier text to supplement with.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Kaplan Behavioral Sciences (2nd ed.)

$11.50

Kaplan's Psyc/Soc is their weakest book, and generally will not cover all the terms students will encounter during MCAT. It does a good job providing a schema for the types of questions asked, however, it's recommended you supplement with Khan Academy, or some other resource to ensure you cover all the vocabulary.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Psychology and Sociology (2nd ed.)

$17.98

TPR Pysc/Soc does a better job then Kaplan at covering terms you need to know for the exam, however it is recommended you supplment with KA videos.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

14/20
Get it

NextStep Psychology and Sociology: Content Review (2014)

$30.35

NS smartly chose to make their best section the newest section on the MCAT. Their Psyc/Soc unit will cover most, if not all of the terms on the MCAT. Since this section contains the most terminology to memorize, it's always recommended you supplement with KA videos

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Berkeley Review Psychology (2015)

$49.00

TBR is known for its extensive content review, and this psyc/soc text does not fail to deliver, including many of the concepts and vocabulary some of the other big testprep companies fail to include. Not a bad idea to supplement with KA videos

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

NextStep Psychology and Sociology: Strategy and Practice (2014)

$13.50

NS makes great practice exams, but need to revamp their strategy books. This one is good for getting the general layout of the P/S section, but should defintely be supplemented with other texts and media.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

12/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Social Inequality

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Society and Culture

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Behavior

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Individuals and Society

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Processing the environment

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

NextStep Psychology and Sociology: Content Review (2016)

$30.35

Not entirely comprehensive in terms of content review, would supplement with either media or a heavier text. Succinct. NS has great practice exams, however, at unbeatable prices, so definitely check them out!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Khan Academy Psyc/Soc PBQs

$0.00

This is by far the best resource out there to help consolidate new concepts and terms on the Psyc/Soc section. It is essential you do as many as these as you can! Look up any terms you do know or watch KA videos. This is the perfect supplement to a psyc/soc review text. Seriously, do them all (if you can)!

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Psychology & Sociology (10th ed.)

$34.88

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <60 days, and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Psyc/Soc will show you most of the terms you can expect to see on the exam, and hammers in how they all interface with AAMC-style multiple choice questions. This book is only 115 pages, and contains many of the terms you can expect to see on test day, so read it cover to cover, non-negotiable.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Biochemistry Content Review

ExamKrackers Biology 1: Molecules (9th ed.)

$28.99

EK Biology 1 does a good job of covering the basics you need to know for the MCAT, but lacks the depth for people who are learning the material for the first time. Also lacks extensive Biochem content (the 10th edition improves on this), which comprises more than 25% of two sections of the new MCAT. Recommended if you have a moderate to strong base in Biology, as a supplement to a bulkier review book, or if you have little time to study for the MCAT.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Kaplan Biochemistry (2nd ed.)

$22.69

Probably Kaplan's best book in that they devote an entire unit to covering Biochem, recognizing how pivotal a firm understand of the topic is to doing well on the MCAT. Covers everything you will need to know regarding Biochem on the MCAT, however, its recommended that since Biochem makes up so much of the new MCAT, if you do not understand all of the content in this book that you find other resources to fill knowledge gaps such as KA or EK or some other lighter text/media. The discretes at the end of the chapter are good for content retention, but do not closely mimic discretes on the actual MCAT. This last fact goes for the entirety of Kaplan's 7-subject review set.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Biochemistry (1st ed.)

$50.11

The 1st edition Biology and Biochemistry will give you a comprehensive review of the majority of Bio and BC concepts you can expect to have on test day. TPR's standalone Biochemistry books aren't as holistic as this text, so it's recommended you use this book to kill two birds with one stone.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 1001 Questions in MCAT Biology

$29.99

Great practice for discretes and to consolidate a lot of that information, however beware of errors. EK 1001s are known for having numerous errors.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Biomolecules

$0.00

Great for practice Biochem concepts, and its free! Not very representative of MCAT style questions

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

Khan Academy MCAT Test Prep Videos: Cells

$0.00

Reading the passages help reinforce science concepts, as well as reasoning through the questions. Would recommend doing as many as possible, but focus more on their Psyc/Soc section, which is their very best and covers all the terms you need to know on the MCAT. Moreover, KA has separated each section by the AAMC outline of foundational concepts, so defintely use this to gauge how well you understand each concept.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

The Princeton Review Biochemistry (2nd ed)

$8.98

This is the later, standalone Biochemistry text TPR offers. It is not as comprehensive as the combined Bio and BC text offered in the first edition of the book.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

11/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Biology 1: Molecules (10th ed.)

$28.52

ExamKracker's latest in MCAT preparation, and they do not dissapoint! This is essential if you're cramming for the exam in <60 days, and want to review all the high-yield topics in an efficient manner. They include 24 in chapter lecture problems as well as a 30 minute exam for each lecture. This is the hallmark of EK--they consolidate the concepts by asking you questions that make you think critically, and it works. Biology 1 focuses on the Biochem aspect of the exam, covering Enzymes, Amino Acids, and Genetics and asks great questions to help you memorize and reason through the material.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

15/20
Get it

Other MCAT Practice

ExamKrackers Test 1

$50.00

Closer to the actual AAMC MCAT than Kaplan, TBR, and TPR. Just behind Altius and Next Step in terms of similarity to the MCAT. Slightly more difficult, still a valuable resource. Many claim the 3rd exam is the best of the 4. One thing to note is that their wrong answer explanations are a bit short.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Test 2

$50.00

Closer to the actual AAMC MCAT than Kaplan, TBR, and TPR. Just behind Altius and Next Step in terms of similarity to the MCAT. Slightly more difficult, still a valuable resource. Many claim the 3rd exam is the best of the 4. One thing to note is that their wrong answer explanations are a bit short.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Test 3

$50.00

Closer to the actual AAMC MCAT than Kaplan, TBR, and TPR. Just behind Altius and Next Step in terms of similarity to the MCAT. Slightly more difficult, still a valuable resource. Many claim the 3rd exam is the best of the 4. One thing to note is that their wrong answer explanations are a bit short.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

ExamKrackers Test 4

$50.00

Closer to the actual AAMC MCAT than Kaplan, TBR, and TPR. Just behind Altius and Next Step in terms of similarity to the MCAT. Slightly more difficult, still a valuable resource. Many claim the 3rd exam is the best of the 4. One thing to note is that their wrong answer explanations are a bit short.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it

NextStep 4 MCAT Bundle

$100.00

Tied with Altius as the most representative practice exams for the new MCAT (save for the AAMC's) in terms of difficulty and feel of the questions. Defintely purchase at least 4, if possible.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

NextStep 6 MCAT Bundle

$150.00

Tied with Altius as the most representative practice exams for the new MCAT (save for the AAMC's) in terms of difficulty and feel of the questions. Defintely purchase at least 4, if possible.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

NextStep 10 MCAT Bundle

$249.00

Tied with Altius as the most representative practice exams for the new MCAT (save for the AAMC's) in terms of difficulty and feel of the questions. Defintely purchase at least 4, if possible.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

NextStep Free 1/2 Length Diagnostic

$0.00

Tied with Altius as the most representative practice exams for the new MCAT (save for the AAMC's) in terms of difficulty and feel of the questions. Defintely purchase at least 4, if possible.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

The Berkeley Review 4 Full-Length CBT Bundle

$135.00

Definitely one of the most difficult practice exams (tied with Kaplan). Not wholly representative of the MCAT, but the harder questions will make taking the AAMC exams feel like a breeze.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

16/20
Get it

ExamKrackers 16 Mini MCATs

$15.00

EK's mini-MCATS (M&Ms) provides an intriguing schedule in that you take "mini-exams" that give 2 passages worth of each subject, organized by chapter. Not a bad resource, especially if you schedule in taking one on a regular basis, however, many of the sections are outdated for the new MCAT exam, yet still provide good practice.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

13/20
Get it

Kaplan MCAT 528: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students (2nd ed.)

$10.00

Good for introducing you to the overall layout of the exam, and some general strategies, but not much else. Definitely not an essential buy

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

10/20
Get it

Altius Test Prep Practice Exams Package

$300.00

Tied with NS as most representative practice exams currently out. Note some complain of duplicated passages, and the fact that you must buy all 10 practice exams at once, however, they have a free one.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

19/20
Get it

Kaplan MCAT 528: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students (1st ed.)

$10.49

K528 has relevant tips and tricks to help you overall, but this book lacks content and tailored practice to really consolidate all the concepts you need to know for the exam.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

11/20
Get it

UWorld MCAT Qbank

$199.00

UWorld’s MCAT Q bank offers over 800 questions with great in-depth explanations. They are known for their USMLE question banks that 90% of all medical students choose to prepare for the board exams. It is a relatively new resource but with UWorld’s track record we definitely recommend it.

StudyScore™ (what does this mean?)

Most resources list are 10+, otherwise they would not be effective study tools

0-5 include resources that are either heavily outdated are just cover too much depth (or too little) to be used as a resource for focused studying on the exam. This would include textbooks such as Lehninger’s Biochemistry—filled with great content but is not practical as a study tool.

5-10 are moderately outdated resources (dating back to the old MCAT) that have some relevant concepts, but should only be used if access to newer resources is not possible

10-15 constitute resources that do a good job of covering what you need to know for the exam, but either lack depth or cover beyond the scope of what you need to know in an inefficient manner, and should therefore be supplemented with additional resources. Also, it may describe a resource that dates back to the old exam but still provides relevant content and/or strategies for the new MCAT

16-18 are resources everyone should strive to have as they are strongly recommended because they cover the material, in depth, of what you need to review and/or learn for the MCAT. This includes many of the bulky texts from the “Big Three” (Kaplan, TPR, TBR), Khan Academy videos, which are an essential instructional tool, and valuable practice exams.

19-20 Are must-have’s. This includes all AAMC content, and the practice exams that most closely mimic the actual MCAT. Note that all practice exams are rated 15+ because it is imperative that you continually master how to take the exam in order to do well.

18/20
Get it
Company
Contact
FAQ